Country France | Rwanda

Discipline Dance | Music | Theater

Audience Adults

Recomended for +16

Duration 75 minutes

Language English, with Spanish subtitles

Dates January 10, 11 and 12, 19:30h

This makes sophisticated theater (...). Its multiple levels are an important addition to our understanding of how art may relate to what none of us long to know

—The New York Times

In 1994, when Rwandan choreographer Dorothé Munyaneza was 12, her country was subject to one of the most brutal genocides of the last few decades. In less than 100 days, around a million people were murdered. The majority of the women who survived were raped and 5,000 children were born as a result. She and her family were able to flee to London, but the atrocities she saw made her realize that some realities are unspeakable and that words can be brimming with pain. In Unwanted, Dorothé Munyaneza goes back to the land of her birth and turns the tears of these mothers into bodily movements. Accompanied by voices, sounds, songs and stories, her choreography takes a long hard look at the facts. Her body navigates its way through the stories she heard when talking to the victims and studying how they express their pain in their movements. Together with the North American punk singer Holland Andrews and French composer Alain Mahé, Munyaneza brings the tragedy of Rwanda’s genocide and an undeniable truth to the stage: bodies talk even when voices have been silenced.

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Direction

Dorothée Munyaneza

(Rwanda, 1982)

A choreographer, dancer, musician, singer and actress who was born in Kigali and emigrated to London, where she studied social science and music. She wrote the soundtrack for the movie Hotel Rwanda (2004) by Terry George and, in 2006, without any formal training, she danced in the piece Sans Retour by French choreographer François Verret. In 2014, she created her own company called Kadidi and premiered her first individual piece, Samedi Détente. Her pieces have been performed at the Festival d’Avignon, the Théâtre de la Ville in Paris and at other important venues and in countries such as England and the United States. She lives in France.

Created by Dorothée Munyaneza | With Holland Andrews, Alain Mahé and Dorothée Munyaneza | Visual artist Bruce Clark | Music Dorothée Munyaneza, Holland Andrews, Alain Mahé | Set designer Vincent Gadras | Lighting designer Christian Dubet | Costumes Stéphanie Coudert | Artistic consultant Faustin Linyekula | Poetry slam Ntare | Technical director Marion Piry | Lighting engineer Marine Le Vey | Sound engineers Camille Frachet, Valérie Bacjsa | Producer and booking director Emmanuel Magis, assisted by Clémence Pierre, Judith Sevilla, Anahi | Media manager Dorothée Duplan, assisted by Eva Dias, Flore Guiraud and Louise Dubreuil from Agence Plan Bey | Set construction Ateliers de la Maison de la Culture de Bourges (MCB), Scène Nationale. www.anahiproduction.fr

Produced by the Kadidi company, Anahi | Co-produced by the Festival d’Avignon; Théâtre de Nîmes – Scène Conventionnée pour la Danse Contemporaine; Le Liberté – Scène Nationale de Toulon; Pôle Arts de la Scène – Friche la Belle de Mai; La Chartreuse de Villeneuve-les-Avignon – Centre National des Écritures du Spectacle; the Museum of Dance – Rennes; Théâtre Garonne – Scène Européenne – Toulouse; Maison de la Culture de Bourges (MCB) Scène Nationale; Bois de l’Aune – Aix en Provence; BIT Teatergarasjen-Bergen; Pôle Sud – Centre de Développement Chorégraphique de Strasbourg; L’Échangeur (CDC) Hauts de France; Escales Danse en Val d’Oise; Théâtre de St Quentin-en-Yvelines, Scène Nationale; Théâtre du Fil de l’Eau - Ville de Pantin; Théâtre Forum Meyrin, Geneva; Tanz im August/HAU Hebbel am Ufer, Berlin and the Festival d’Automne in Paris |

With backing from DRAC PACA – Ministry of Culture and Communication, PACA and ARCADI Regions; Fonds de Dotation du Quartz – Brest; Creative Exchange Lab of the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art; the Africa Contemporary Arts Consortium/USA and the Baryshnikov Arts Center, New York, NY; the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC); Fonds SACD Stage Music and Fonds SACD Theater; Fonds Transfabrik – the Franco-German Fund for the Performing Arts; ADAMI and SPEDIDAM. With help from Montévidéo Marseille.

The Kadidi company regularly receives support for its international tours from the French Institute.

Dorothée Munyaneza is an artistic partner of the Théâtre de la Ville in Paris and is doing a residency at L'Apostrophe - Scène Nationale Cergy-Pontoise & Val d'Oise.

Thanks to Godeliève Mukasarasi, the women and young people of the SEVOTA Association (Rwanda) and to Pauline Georget from Emmaüs Alternatives.

  • One of the most important choreographers on the contemporary dance scene, this is Dorothée Munyaneza’s first time performing in Chile. Before creating her own company, she worked with renowned choreographers such as Mark Tompkins, Robyn Orlin, Rachid Ouramdane and Alain Buffard. Her pieces have been performed at important venues worldwide, such as the Festival d’Avignon and the Baryshnikov Arts Center in New York and she is an artistic partner of the Théâtre de la Ville in Paris.

  • Through music, dance and the written word, Dorothée Munyaneza looks for ways to explore individual and collective memory using the body, giving a voice to those who were silenced or abused in Rwanda’s genocide, a massacre that her pieces continuously question and examine. Her aim, she says, is “to break the silence about and shed some light on the scars history leaves”. This is the second time she has dealt with this tragedy, doing so for the first time in Samedi Détente (2014).

  • Unwanted is an exploration based on pain and trauma and how difficult it is to turn them into communicable experiences. This dilemma is something that has concerned the artists and theorists who have studied exterminations: these are inaccessible phenomena whose horror is impossible to convey in either words or images. Dorothée Munyaneza looks for new ways of doing so through dance, the spoken word and sounds. "Unwanted is more music than dance. At times, the singing comes close to the intense outpouring of the blues. Sequences of chanting show a different way to deal with bleak facts: quietly intoning things that happened as part of history”, she explains in the New York Times.

  • Unwanted was premiered at the Festival d’Avignon, the most important theatrical event in Europe and it received rave reviews in the press in the United States, such as The New Yorker and The New York Times.

  • Munyaneza is accompanied on stage by composer and punk singer Holland Andrews, better known as Like a Villain and by French electronic music composer Alain Mahé. The set was created by South African visual artist, Bruce Clark.
  • Rwanda. The recent history of this Central African country - which became a Belgian colony after the First World War - is marked by the 1994 genocide carried out by the Hutu tribe-dominated government against the Tutsi population in the context of the Rwandan Civil War, which started at the beginning of the nineties. 75% of this ethnic group was annihilated and it’s estimated that between 500,000 and a million people were murdered. The mass rapes its women were subject to led to thousands of unwanted pregnancies; many of these children were brutally murdered or rejected by their families if they survived. The massacre’s brutal nature led to the creation of the International Criminal Tribunal in La Hague to deal with genocides, crimes against humanity and war crimes.

  • The creative process. This piece was not only based on testimonies from women from Rwanda but also on those of women from The Congo, Chad, Syria and the former Yugoslavia, all of whom were raped during the wars in their countries. “They told me how difficult it was for them to love their children and live on their own, because the majority had been rejected by their families. They and their children, who are now adults, shared their most painful moments with me”, says Munyaneza, who finally decided to base the piece just on the land of her birth. She says that all the spoken testimonies she recorded were turned into physical and choreographic material.

«Dorothée Munyaneza has transformed their stories into movement, words, and song, in a process that at times comes close to a kind of physical exorcism»

The New Yorker

«What on paper could cause apprehension and even fear becomes something surprisingly intense in Unwanted, mainly because the mesmerizing Dorothée Munyaneza is a living example of a ‘show woman’»

Libération

«The range of idioms employed here veers between the cool objectivity of spoken docudrama and the intensely lyrical extremes of quasi-operatic mad scenes»

—The New York Times

This makes sophisticated theater (...). Its multiple levels are an important addition to our understanding of how art may relate to what none of us long to know

—The New York Times

«Dorothée Munyaneza has transformed their stories into movement, words, and song, in a process that at times comes close to a kind of physical exorcism»

The New Yorker

«What on paper could cause apprehension and even fear becomes something surprisingly intense in Unwanted, mainly because the mesmerizing Dorothée Munyaneza is a living example of a ‘show woman’»

Libération

«The range of idioms employed here veers between the cool objectivity of spoken docudrama and the intensely lyrical extremes of quasi-operatic mad scenes»

—The New York Times

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