Country Chile

Discipline Theater

Recomended for +14

Duration 105 minutes

Language Spanish

Dates January 18 and 19, 21.00h

Tribus is a mature and solid piece that raises compelling questions. A family that exalts learning has stopped listening and their monologues reflect their fragility and anxiety. Everyone’s got disabilities and not all of them are physical

El Mercurio

Willy is a member of an unconventional family, with its own language, rules and humor and to whom arguments are a sign of affection. Willy is deaf, although he’s really the only one who listens. When he meets Sylvia, who starts teaching him sign language, there’s a series of reactions and desperate attempts by this tribe to defend their group dynamic. After winning over critics in London, New York and Buenos Aires, this piece by British playwright Nina Raine is brought to Chile by outstanding young Chilean director Manuela Oyarzún. Written in 2010, the play stars a young deaf man who is treated as an equal by his family as a way of protecting him (to the extent that they pretend he isn’t deaf), although it gets to the point where they are unable to keep denying it. The witty and scathing script is an invitation to reflect on who’s the one with the problem: the person that can’t hear or the person that doesn’t want to listen? Affection is disguised as rejection, prejudice and cynicism in order to strengthen the idea of the clan - in this case, a family ‘tribe’ that closes ranks and imprisons its members so that no one can enter or leave.

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Direction

Manuela Oyarzún

(Chile)

Manuela Oyarzún is a director, playwright, teacher and theater and film actress. She founded El Hijo company, putting on the plays La mujer gallina and Sala de urgencias to great success. She has acted in plays by important directors, such as Andrés Pérez, Ramón Griffero, Fernando González and Rodrigo Pérez. Her play Tracy Ridícula was selected for the 2005 Playwriting Exhibition. She wrote, directed and acted in Cabeza de ovni (2007), a story about the solitude and abandonment of the elderly starring Bélgica Castro and Alejandro Sieveking, as well as Surubai (2010). In 2009, she acted in and directed La vagina de Laura Ingalls by Alejandro Moreno with Claudia Celedón.

Dramaturgy

Nina Raine

(Alemania)

Nina Raine is an English theater director and playwright, daughter of poet Craig Raine and great-niece of the Russian novelist Boris Pasternak. Her first play Rabbit (2006) was a critical success and won her the Evening Standard and Critics’ Circle awards for most promising playwright. Tribes, premiered at the Royal Court Theater in London in 2010, proved to be a milestone in recent English theater and was well-received in the United Kingdom and the United States. She won the New York Critics’ Circle Award for best play for this piece and has written other plays such as The Drunks (2009) and Tiger Country (2011).

Written by Nina Raine | Director Manuela Oyarzún | Cast Mateo Iribarren, Tamara Acosta, Pablo Manzi, Ignacia Baeza, Andrea García-Huidobro and Nicolás Zárate | Executive producer Ignacia Baeza | General producer Margarita Santa María | Assistant director Diego Barrios | Set and lighting designer Belén Abarza | Costume designer Macarena Ahumada | Sound designer Esteban Oyarzún | Chilean sign language consultant Andrea Pérez |Translated by Rodrigo Olavarría | Co-produced by the UC Theater and Baeza Producciones

  • In its original version, Tribes was a success with both critics and audiences alike in both the United Kingdom and the United States. “This play’s great merit is dramatizing something that’s really hard to understand if you haven’t experienced it firsthand”, wrote The Guardian, highlighting that Raine “has many biting and unsentimental things to say about ‘the neuroses of bohemian families with a talent for abusing people’”. Referring to the Argentine version, the newspaper Clarín said that “the sarcasm, bitterness, sensitivity but, above all, empathy that the characters provoke are key to this story”.

  • There’s a great team behind the play. As well as director Manuela Oyarzún, there’s a cast of heavyweights: Mateo Iribarren, Tamara Acosta, Andrea García-Huidobro, Nicolás Zárate, Pablo Manzi (Dónde viven los bárbaros, Tú amarás) and Ignacia Baeza (Pacto de Sangre, Cerati, nada personal). Talking about Manzi - also a director and playwright and co-founder of the Bonobo company - the press has said “he is shaping up to be the catalyst for great change in the theater” and that “he stands out for the human depth he imprints on his character”.

  • For Manuela Oyarzún, the key to the play’s success is in its transversal appeal, telling La Panera: “You can find similarities with many different contemporary tribes. The family is a tribe, the deaf community another, any minority, religion, race, profession or gender creates a tribe. This is what the play proposes. There’s no way of escaping it, since it’s the characters’ form of salvation in this case, but it’s also their prison”.
  • What’s masculine in the play. Manuel Oyarzún explained in La Panera that in the play, “intellect is overvalued, more so that affection”, something that appears to be very masculine. In her own words, “the play also shows a macho, conservative and patriarchal family, something I find annoying and anachronistic. Being a woman playwright and director, I suppose this might be overexposure to some extent”.

«A fast-paced piece with considerable dark humor»

La Tercera

«The cast is made up of a mixed group of actors efficiently directed by Manuela Oyarzún, who manages to leave her unmistakable mark on each of the performances»

El Mercurio

«This version stands out for a series of amazing decisions: it manages to piece together the gradual breakdown of a family in great detail»

El Desconcierto

«A play that’s worth going to see for the mammoth – and complex – reflection it includes, which aims to make the audience explode»

Marietta Santi, santi.cl

Tribus is a mature and solid piece that raises compelling questions. A family that exalts learning has stopped listening and their monologues reflect their fragility and anxiety. Everyone’s got disabilities and not all of them are physical

El Mercurio

«A fast-paced piece with considerable dark humor»

La Tercera

«The cast is made up of a mixed group of actors efficiently directed by Manuela Oyarzún, who manages to leave her unmistakable mark on each of the performances»

El Mercurio

«This version stands out for a series of amazing decisions: it manages to piece together the gradual breakdown of a family in great detail»

El Desconcierto

«A play that’s worth going to see for the mammoth – and complex – reflection it includes, which aims to make the audience explode»

Marietta Santi, santi.cl

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