Country France | India

Discipline Dance

Recomended for General Audience

Duration 80 minutes

Dates January 3 and 4, 20.30h

Keywords Women

Warning Sin subtítulos. Con locuciones introductorias en español

Shantala Shivalingappa fascinates contemporary creators like Pina Bausch, Peter Brook, Ushio Umagatsu (...) She’s a bird of paradise, pecking at tidbits from Europe and India at the same time

Le Figaro

Swayambhu means something that happens spontaneously; something that appears from nothing. In Sanskrit, this word refers to a stone or rock that looks like a divinity, such as Ganesha, the god with an elephant’s head or Shiva, the king of dance. Award-winning dancer Shantala Shivalingappa, born in India but raised in France, transforms this concept into bodily movements and - a cross between craftswoman and alchemist - tries to give the term a physical dimension. One of the most famous exponents of this art form visits Chile with a fast-paced and dazzling Kuchipudi dance spectacle from the south of India. As well as having performed at important venues worldwide, this creator has amazed people such as choreographer Pina Bausch and playwright Peter Brook, who both invited her to work with them. Dancing to the sound of live music, Shantala Shivalingappa attempts to bring reality to life through her body as an infinite plane of unity, fluidity and energy, where each element is polished, perfected and cared for so it can be expressed in its most pure form. Swayambhu is shaped by the magic of alchemy.

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Director and dancer

Shantala Shivalingappa

(India)

Shantala Shivalingappa is a dancer and choreographer who trained in classical Indian dance. She was born in Madras and raised in Paris. She learnt Kuchipudi, a dance from the south of India from a young age, which has gained her international recognition. Acclaimed in her native country and the West for her dance technique and style, she has performed at important venues such as the Théâtre de la Ville in Paris, Sadler’s Wells In London and the Herbst Theater in San Francisco. Famous choreographer Pina Bausch included her in her productions Nefés and Bamboo Blues and she has also worked with the legendary Peter Brook and Maurice Béjart. In 2013, she won the Bessie award for her show Shiva Ganga.

Concept, artistic creation and performer Shantala Shivalingappa | Artistic adviser Savitry Nair | Orchestra B.P.Haribabu (cymbals and percussion), J. Ramesh (singer), N. Ramakrishnan (percussion), K.S. Jayaram (flute) | Lighting designer Nicolas Boudier | Stage director Amandine Galodé | Sound designer Cyril Colombo | Rhythm creators B.P. Haribabu and N.Ramakrishnan | Costume designer D.S.AIYYELU (Madras) | Produced by Per Diem & Co / Pierre Barnier, Théâtre de la Ville, Paris | Co-produced by Théâtre de la Ville 2010 | Staging [H]ikari Production / Gaëlle Seguin

  • This is Shantala Shivalingappa’s first presentation in Chile. She is considered one of the most important Indian dancers in the world. She is one of the best performers of Kuchipudi, a dance from southern India that she has perfected over the years. She originally learnt it from her mother, legendary dancer Savitry Nair, who for years worked with French-Swiss choreographer and director Maurice Béjart, a big name in twentieth century dance.

  • Swayambhu is a unique opportunity to take a closer look at the culture and world view of India through dance, music and costumes, three essential elements in Shantala Shivalingappa’s performances. Four musicians accompany her on stage and, using songs and instruments such as flutes, cymbals and drums, bring melodies and stories to life that the charismatic choreographer interprets with verve using the movements of her body and facial expressions.

  • Made up of seven acts, this piece is a dance and poetry recital that invokes deities such as Vani, goddess of the arts and knowledge; pays tribute to Ganesha, who accompanies all new beginnings and symbolizes happiness, compassion and everything auspicious; dedicates the dance of Tarangam to Shiva, goddess of dance and includes narration, poetry, meditation and the expressive movements of this type of dance.

  • Since she was 13, Shantala has had the privilege of working with some of the greatest artists in contemporary dance, such as the legendary French-Swiss choreographer Maurice Béjart (1789…et nous), English playwright Peter Brook (The Tempest and Hamlet), German choreographer Pina Bausch (O Dido, Néfès and Bamboo Blues) and the famous Japanese choreographer Ushio Amagatsu (Ibuki). These experiences have given her a career that has been a unique artistic journey.

  • Pina Bausch was one of Shivalingappa’s mentors, helping her find a more spontaneous and free way of moving. The German choreographer, for her part, admired the beauty of Shantala’s gestures and her fluidity, charm, femininity and agility, creating solos just for her.

  • In 2013, Shantala Shivalingappa won a Bessie award, one of the major international contemporary dance prizes — won by figures such as Bob Wilson, Pina Bausch, Jerôme Bel, Angelin Preljocaj and Trisha Brown — for her show Shiva Ganga.

  • Shantala Shivalingappa has performed at important venues and festivals worldwide, such as the Théâtre de la Ville in Paris, the Jacob’s Pillow Festival in New York, Sadler’s Wells in London and the Herbst Theater in San Francisco.
  • Indian dance. India has a rich dance history, with styles varying according to the country’s different regions and local customs. Officially, only eight traditional dances are recognized as classical Indian dances by the Sangeet Natak National Academy for Performing Arts. Dance is an essential part of the country’s culture and there are several different styles: classical (as performed by Shantala Shivalingappa), semi-classical, folkloric and tribal.

  • Kuchipudi. This is a classical dance from southern India whose name comes from a small town in the state of Andhra Pradesh. Like all classical forms of Indian dance, it’s based on Natia-shastra, a treaty on the dramatic arts, theater, dance and music that is 2,000 years old and which describes these artistic forms. Kuchipudi has two main features: pure dance and expressive dance. Pure dance is rhythmic and abstract and is characterized by complex musical rhythms that the body dances to using precise and graceful movements. Expressive dance or abhinaya has a narrative dimension: each part of the body is used to bring a text, poem or story to life and it is recited using a song.

  • Pina Bausch. This award-winning German dancer and choreographer, who passed away in 2009, was one of the most important figures in world contemporary dance. Her cutting-edge style was characterized by a fusion of dance and theater. Her interests lay in exploring the human body’s possibilities and linking them to the dancers’ private lives, biographies and personal stories. She founded the legendary Tanztheater Wuppertal company and had close connections to Chile through her relationship with artist Ronald Kay and her presentations at Santiago a Mil: in 2007, she put on Masurca Fogo and in 2010 Como el musguito en la piedra, ay si si sí..., co-produced by the Teatro a Mil Foundation and the result of a residency in different regions of Chile.

«(Shantala) shows a fine sense of theater in her entrances and exits (…) Her thin voice singing a prayer at the evening’s close underscored her humility: a young woman who, in her devotion to her art, earns ours»

The New York Times

«Apart from her strength, what impresses you is her naturalness»

The New Yorker

«Her immaterial grace, her perfect elegance and the energy radiating from this admirable dancer is spellbinding»

Le Nouvel Obs

Shantala Shivalingappa fascinates contemporary creators like Pina Bausch, Peter Brook, Ushio Umagatsu (...) She’s a bird of paradise, pecking at tidbits from Europe and India at the same time

Le Figaro

«(Shantala) shows a fine sense of theater in her entrances and exits (…) Her thin voice singing a prayer at the evening’s close underscored her humility: a young woman who, in her devotion to her art, earns ours»

The New York Times

«Apart from her strength, what impresses you is her naturalness»

The New Yorker

«Her immaterial grace, her perfect elegance and the energy radiating from this admirable dancer is spellbinding»

Le Nouvel Obs

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