Country Suiza

Audience Youth | Adults

Recomended for +12

Duration 90 minutes

Language English, French and German, with Spanish subtitles

Dates January 4, 16.00h y 19.00 / From January 5 to 18 de enero, 14.30h and 19.00 h (except Monday 7 and 14)

Warning This is an installation to be walked around

This journey into a world of death is not sinister or dismal. Without being flippant, it’s an invitation for us to reflect on our afterlife

Le Soir

The German word ‘Nachlass’ refers to the tangible and intangible estate a person leaves behind when they die. What’s left after death? How can we dramatize our memories? Together with set designer Dominic Huber, Swiss-German director Stefan Kaegi, member of the Rimini Protokoll theater group, met with people who, for different reasons, decided to prepare their goodbyes. The result is an installation made up of eight immersive areas that use voices, objects and images so that those who are not actually present can describe what they want to leave of themselves when they die. A Muslim from Zurich arranges for his body to be returned to his native Istanbul, a German banker reflects on his role during the Nazi occupation and an employee from the nineties asks herself what story her photos will tell. Nachlass – Pièces sans personnes, produced by the Théâtre Vidy-Lausanne, Switzerland, is an emotional journey, a reflection on our awareness of death and also a study of inheritance, material goods and the bureaucracy that surrounds passing away. What do we want to leave to future generations, to our loved ones, to the society that took us in? With Nachlass, spectators we are invited to walk through this installation full of thresholds, passing between being present and being absent and life and death in order to reflect on their own mortality.

| Multimedia

Direction

Stefan Kaegi

(Switzerland, 1972)

Stefan Kaegi is a Swiss-German documentary theater director and producer, who in 2000 cofounded the acclaimed Rimini Protokoll group with Helgard Haug and Daniel Wetzel. He has collaborated on various projects with the Argentine writer and theater director Lola Arias, including Ciudades paralelas, a ‘mobile festival’ based on urban interventions. His approach to theater is anything but traditional: his work is known for representing reality in unconventional places, such as the street, buses or public buildings, similar to performance pieces and creating complex theater experiences. In 2011, he won the Silver Lion at the Venice Biennale.

Direction

Dominic Huber

(Switzerland, 1972)

Dominic Huber is a director and set designer who works at places not normally aimed at a single audience but rather so that large groups of individuals can witness a specific theatrical experience. His work intends to create a sense of heightened reality, increasing how the senses are appealed to through the artistic manipulation of spaces and situations. Since 2008, he has been a regular collaborator of Stefan Kaegi and Lola Arias and has developed multiple multimedia theatrical installations with Rimini Protokoll.

Théâtre Vidy-Lausanne

A creative centre for French-speaking theatre in the heart of Romandy, the Vidy-Lausanne Theatre reaps the benefits of the favourable position of the Vaud capital, located at the crossroads of Europe and establishing itself as a venue that is open to the world, where Latin and Germanic theatre and artistic cultures in particular enter into dialogue. Vidy-Lausanne Theatre is open to all and dedicated to contemporary creation, defining itself as a site of encounters between today’s art and the widest possible audience. Its programme has been under the helm of Vincent Baudriller since September 2013 and associates strong artistic loyalties with renowned international artists and a revival in interest for the youngest generations of artists, thus making Vidy a reference institution as well as a forward-thinking place of discovery.

Concept by Stefan Kaegi and Dominic Huber | Video Bruno Deville | Written by Katja Hagedorn | Sound Frédéric Morier | Creation assistants Magali Tosato, Déborah Helle (intern) | Set assistant Clio Van Aerde, Marine Brosse (intern) | Technical creation and construction Théâtre Vidy-Laussane Workshop |

Produced by the Théâtre Vidy-Laussane | Coproduced by Rimini Apparat; Schauspielhaus Zurich; Bonlieu Scène Nationale Annecy and the Bâtie-Festival in Geneva in the framework of the Maillon’s French-Swiss 2014-2020 INTERREG program; the Strasbourg Theater - Scène Européenne; the Stadsschouwburg Amsterdam; the Staatsschauspiel Dresden and Carolina Performing Arts | With the support of the Casino Barrière Foundation, Montreux and the Berlin City Hall - Chancellery of the Senate – Cultural Affairs | Touring sponsorship from Pro Helvetia - Swiss Arts Council

  • Nachlass - Pièces sans personnes is a sensitive approach to the hard-to-tackle topic of death, in itself a unique experience that nobody can describe. Faced with this dilemma, Stefan Kaegi explains that "Nachlass is an attempt to witness not death itself but the journey that each one of us will be forced to make sooner or later”. According to the creator, this installation is based around questions such as: How can absence be felt? How can the story of something that’s over be told?

  • This project is the result of a long period of documented research. Stefan Kaegi and his collaborators spent two years at palliative care centers and hospitals; in scientific research laboratories and funeral homes; at old peoples’ homes and religious centers and with forensic scientists, neurologists and lawyers for whom death is a constant concern. This is how they found people who, for different reasons, had chosen to prepare for their deaths, taking these cases to create a unique piece that could be called ‘the life after death’.

  • The layout of this theatrical installation was carefully designed: there are eight rooms, each one dedicated to a person’s Nachlass (inheritance), made up of objects, audio recordings and video testimonies. The spectators enter the installation’s main area every 15 minutes in groups of eight. From then on, each spectator can decide for themselves in which order and for how long they want to visit each room.

  • In the words of French playwright Eric Vautrin, "rooms are thresholds between being present and being absent, between life and death; they offer a sensitive approach to one of the truly indescribable human experiences. An exceptional opportunity for theatrical premonition becomes possible. Nachlass is aimed at the living, to remind them that dead people don’t disappear when they pass away”.

  • Stefan Kaegi is a key figure on the contemporary theater scene. Together with his group Rimini Protokoll, he’s developed a piece that concentrates on evolving theater into the pursuit of unusual viewpoints, aiming to tackle reality in multiple ways using live art, theater and installations. Their projects involve thorough research and creative processes that take time, with Rimini Protokoll often considered one of the inventors of a ‘new wave’ of documentary theater. This is the group’s third visit to Chile.
  • Artistic installation. This is a genre of contemporary art in which ideas take precedence over formalities. In other words, the piece’s staging and shape are used to convey the specific concept the artist wants to explore. Objects are used, spaces taken over and elements arranged - from a never-ending list of physical, visual or sound-related media, such as photography, video or performance - to make the audience reflect on certain concepts or feel certain emotions. Stefan Kaegi and Dominic Huber use the specific concept of theatrical installation to describe Nachlass, a project in which the spectators walk through an area and observe situations or stories they have discovered through active participation.

  • Rimini Protokol. A Swiss-German theater group made up of Stefan Kaegi, Helgard Haug and Daniel Wetzel. Since its creation in 2000, it has become known for its exploration of the concept of reality and for tackling its facets from unusual perspectives. Its projects mix theater, urban interventions and performance and it’s currently based at the reputable Hebbel am Ufer Theater (HAU) in Berlin. It’s been described as a ‘protagonist and founder’ of a new way of understanding and tackling reality from the theater, strongly influencing the young theater scene.

  • Documentary theater. This concept goes back to the second half of the twentieth century, when there was an interest in bringing political and historical themes to the stage, thus blurring the lines between fiction and reality. This kind of theater not only uses documents but also collects testimonies, presenting not only the facts themselves but also a more intimate, touching and personal side to the story.

  • Stefan Kaegi and Chile. This is Stefan Kaegi’s third visit to Chile. In 2015, he put on Remote Santiago - a mixture of ‘game, audio-tour and show’ – and an adaptation of the creation already performed in several cities worldwide. Santiago became a large kind of stage, bringing the increasing digitalization of everyday life to the fore. Together with the SonidoCiudad collective and the support of the Goethe Institute in Chile and the Teatro a Mil Foundation, he returned in 2017 to create AppRecuerdos, an app involving an audio-tour of Santiago made up of personal stories, which creates a collective experience in which memory and urban space fuse, giving the city a narrative and subjective dimension. It’s currently available at Google Play and the App Store.

  • Rooms. The installation has eight rooms where the Nachlass (inheritance) of the following people is laid out:
  1. Jeanne Bellengi, a former watch factory employee who was born in 1924 in Bellevaux and passed away in Neuchâtel in 2016.
  2. Alexandre Bergerioux, a former graphic designer and now a fisherman, born in 1971 in Geneva, where he currently lives.
  3. Gabriele von Brochowski, a former European Union ambassador to Africa, born in 1936 who lives between Brussels and Gordes.
  4. Prof. Richard Frackowiak, a former director of the Neuroscience Department at the University Hospital of Vaud in Lausanne. He was born in 1950 in London and today lives in Paris.
  5. Nadine Gros, a retired secretary who was born in 1947 and passed away in 2015. She lived in Maxéville, France.
  6. Michael Schwery, an engineer and base jumper, an extreme sport aficionado. He was born in 1971 in Zurich and lives Wallbach, Switzerland.
  7. Celal Tayip, a retired businessman, born in 1938 in Istanbul. He lives in Zurich.
  8. Annemarie Wolfarth, a retired proofreader (1928-2017) and Dr. Günther Wolfarth (1922-2018), former president of the Baden-Wurtemberg Bank Council, born in Stuttgart.

«Stefan Kaegi and Dominic Huber’s documental theater brings together the testimonies they have collected over two years. Perhaps the most heartbreaking thing of all is what they encourage us to do - create our own legacies during this process»

Les Inrocks

«There’s the aroma of eternity but nothing sinister about Stefan Kaegi’s work (…). Eight rooms and eight stories in which, in fifteen minutes, people tell how they ideally want things to end. We might cry a little, but we also laugh»

Le Temps

«Rimini Protokoll’s creative forces stay true to their concept, taking a new step towards expanding the idea of what theater is and what it consists of»

—Spiegel Online

This journey into a world of death is not sinister or dismal. Without being flippant, it’s an invitation for us to reflect on our afterlife

Le Soir

«Stefan Kaegi and Dominic Huber’s documental theater brings together the testimonies they have collected over two years. Perhaps the most heartbreaking thing of all is what they encourage us to do - create our own legacies during this process»

Les Inrocks

«There’s the aroma of eternity but nothing sinister about Stefan Kaegi’s work (…). Eight rooms and eight stories in which, in fifteen minutes, people tell how they ideally want things to end. We might cry a little, but we also laugh»

Le Temps

«Rimini Protokoll’s creative forces stay true to their concept, taking a new step towards expanding the idea of what theater is and what it consists of»

—Spiegel Online

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