Country Austria

Discipline Urban intervention

Recomended for +2 años

Duration 60 minutes

The result is fascinating (…) Internationally, Dorner is one of dance’s most creative and in-demand professionals”.

–Der Standard, Austria

Living room expands the normal definition of a ‘living room’, something that, in English, refers to the main room in a house, but also the verb ‘to live’: a living room is a place that is alive, a common area used every day. This piece by Willi Dorner - the Austrian choreographer famous for his ground-breaking interventions in public spaces - puts human bodies in domestic spaces as living sculptures, which are then immortalized by photographer Lisa Rastl and shown at an exhibition put on in the houses where the photos were taken. By putting bodies in corners or under chairs or posing them strangely on seats, choreographer Dorner aims to explore the idea of a house from the outside in. He explains that “Living Room can be understood as an intervention that overcomes the cultural boundaries and physical limits of fragile socio-political areas”. Dorner returns to Chile after putting on Every-One at Santiago a Mil in 2017, with photographic material, videos and live interventions bringing this original project to life.

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Company

Compañía Willi Dorner

Created in Vienna in 1999 by Willi Dorner, this company has produced more than 20 pieces for theater and cinema, as well as carrying out urban interventions and running projects in places such as art galleries. Its approach is based on studying the relationship between the body and space using different formats. It has toured in numerous countries and cities performing its pieces and fusing theater, dance, performance and multiple physical disciplines like acrobatics and parkour.

Willi Dorner

(Austria, 1959)

Created and choreographed by Willi Dorner Photos and video Lisa Rastl Assistant choreographer Esther Steinkogler Producer Emanuela Panucci Management Roma Janus | Cast Jose Santibañes, Cristian Cortez, Catalina Tello, Macarena Carrasco

  • Willi Dorner is an internationally renowned choreographer, known for his original pieces, in which he encourages a city’s inhabitants to journey through and look at where they live from a different perspective. He has received numerous awards in Europe for his exploration of new forms of theater and performance, gaining fame for his in situ choreographies. His experimentation with urban and domestic spaces is born from his frustration with theater: “The stage is a dead space. There’s no context (…) I’m more interested in spaces’ economic, political and social aspects”, he has said.
  • This piece promotes exchange between a neighborhood or city’s inhabitants and also between them and visitors from other places. Private homes become meeting places, as well as drawing us into a neighborhood or area’s ‘inside’ story.
  • The Willi Dorner Company describes what led them to create their piece in the following way: “Day in, day out, we operate within a framework of rules and regulations. What’s our role in this and what space is assigned to us? How do we fit in?” Living Room is an attempt to make these rules visible and to change our perception of the everyday spaces we inhabit.
  • Performed in cities such as Paris, Riga and London, Living Room adapts to the specific conditions of each city and is based on collaboration with its residents. That’s why the piece acquires a new, different format in every place it visits.
  • Winner of multiple European awards for his urban interventions, Dorner is interested in the relationship between bodies and the space they inhabit, whether public or private. One of his aims is to force the spectator to take a new look at the scenery, places and architecture that surround them every day and that they’re not aware of. “Architects are like choreographers”, he has said. “They decide where and how we can move around”.
  • Urban intervention. This is the name given to artistic experiences aimed at creating new ways of understanding the relationship between society and space, between cities and those who live in them. Places can be taken over in various ways, for example by video projections, sculptures, performances, posters or graffiti. An urban intervention aims to forge new interactions and experiences regarding how urban spaces are considered, understood and lived in.
  • Street theater. This is the name given to outdoor theater presentations in public which don’t charge an entrance fee, performed on urban stages so a large number of people can see them. It emerged as a way of emancipating the working-class and reinforcing the revolutionary feeling against the powers-that-be at the beginning of the twentieth century. Later, it was developed as a way of making theater more democratic and of taking it to different parts of the city.
  • Every-One. This is the show that Willi Dorner brought to Chile in 2017, involving a group of eight dancers moving from one place in Santiago to the next, performing choreographies that relied on songs, sounds, audiovisual elements and objects.

“They squeeze into alcoves, pile up by litter trays and pose for family photos with chairs on their heads. Meet the dance troupe making no living room safe”.
The Guardian

“(This piece) emerges from a desire to investigate a type of work that involves the artists and audience being not inside a traditional venue, but outside it”.

Der Standard, Austria

The result is fascinating (…) Internationally, Dorner is one of dance’s most creative and in-demand professionals”.

–Der Standard, Austria

“They squeeze into alcoves, pile up by litter trays and pose for family photos with chairs on their heads. Meet the dance troupe making no living room safe”.
The Guardian

“(This piece) emerges from a desire to investigate a type of work that involves the artists and audience being not inside a traditional venue, but outside it”.

Der Standard, Austria

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