Country Colombia

Discipline Theater

Audience Youth | Adults

Recomended for +16

Duration 70 minutes

Language Spanish

Dates January 14, 15 and 16, 19.30h

Warning Tiene contenidos fuertes de índole sexual

A flawless and convincing play, like a ticking clock or a bomb about to explode

­­–El Tiempo, Colombia

Cuando estallan las paredes is the story of an attack - or several of them - from the planning stages to their execution. There are different types of terror and terrorism: more notorious types that include explosions and those that are carried out in silence and don’t create as much alarm. Here, the group that is preparing an attack on a powerful family - as well as the family itself - are both victimizers and victims. Who needs who? That’s what the people involved talk about, both before and after the event. In this play by the prestigious Colombian company Teatro Petra, double standards, power and the spreading of terror are explored and the uncomfortable question ‘Who really wants war and terror to continue?’ is asked. The dysfunctional family of a political and industrial millionaire and the revolutionary group planning to attack them both try to answer this, searching for the reasons and circumstances that lead them to cause different types of terror, using situations that range from absurd to comic and, of course, terrifying.

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Direction

Fabio Rubiano Orjuela

(Colombia)

Fabio Rubiano Orjuela is a playwright, director and actor. Together with Marcela Valencia, he founded Teatro Petra in 1985. Recipient of multiple awards, he won, among others, the 2013 Colombian National Award for best director. He has written more than 20 plays, four of which won the Colombian National Playwriting Award: Gracias por haber venido (1996), Cada vez que ladran los perros (1997), La penúltima cena (1999) and El natalicio de Schumann (2009). Companies from Uruguay, China, Slovenia, Chile, Mexico, the United States, Peru, Spain and France have put on his plays and several of his scripts have been translated into French, English, Slovenian, Chinese, Turkish and Portuguese.

Compañía Teatro Petra

Teatro Petra is one of the most representative contemporary theater groups in Colombia. Their work involves research into and the dramatic writing of scripts and plays. Founded by Fabio Rubiano O. and Marcela Valencia in 1985, their pieces have won the National Playwriting Award four times, Best Play in 2011 for Sara dice and the National Award for Best Director in 2013 for El vientre de la ballena, Sara dice and Pinocho y Frankenstein le tienen miedo a Harrison Ford. They have been invited to perform their plays at more than 40 international festivals in Europe, South America, Mexico and the United States.

Written and directed by Fabio Rubiano Orjuela | Cast Marcela Valencia, Jacques Toukhmanian, Liliana Escobar, Mauricio Santos, Mónica Giraldo, Ana María Cuéllar, Mario Escobar, Santiago Londoño, Fabio Rubiano | Co-produced by the Jorge Eliécer Gaitán Theater and Teatro Petra | Lighting designer Adelio Leiva | Art director Hernán García | Costume designers Teatro Petra, Hernán García | Art assistant Mauricio Santos | Press and publicity Liliana Escobar | Teatro Petra social media Sandra Suárez | Executive producer Daniel Álvarez Mikey (VIVEMIKEY) (Poster) Photography Juan Santacruz | Image designer Giancarlo Pirilli

  • Teatro Petra is one of the most important and award-winning contemporary theater companies in Colombia. In 2015, the group celebrated their thirtieth anniversary with the premiere of Labio de liebre, co-produced by the Colón Theater and which has been described as one of Colombian theater’s all-time greats, being performed in Mexico, Switzerland, France, Brazil and Peru.

  • Teatro Petra’s productions deal with controversial political and social subjects that, while navigating their way through pain and violence, always include the most ironic form of humor, creating what they call “laughter that hurts”.

  • Fabio Rubiano explains the play’s premise in the following way: "Cuando estallan las paredes is a reference to terror and what it means to be a terrorist. It focuses on what is theatrical, which is why the time periods change. Everything’s a variation on terror and terrorism. Without opponents, there’re no protagonists. No single position is good or bad; it’s a permanent debate on the conditions of terror; what it is and what’s frightening”.

  • One of Teatro Petra’s main concerns, say its creators, is talking about conflict without resorting to biased archetypes or ideological manifestos. How can the victims and killers be given a voice without entering into a polarizing discussion?

  • The press highlighted the production’s fast pace, the different planes of action throughout the whole play, its art, its characters and finally the script, which leaves the audience both highly concerned and uncomfortable.
  • The characters in the play. In Colombian newspaper El Tiempo, it was explained that the characters are perfect examples of Colombian society. “There’s Lombana, a tycoon and art collector but at the same time a ‘man of war’; his wife, ‘the perfect lady’ and an alcoholic, who is scandalized to think that one day the rebels could win out and she’ll have to stand in line with ‘ugly people’; Doctor Brasil, a psychoanalyst and the wife’s lover; an anorexic daughter who’s proud of her protruding bones; a homosexual son they try to hide away; the pretty guerrilla with scruples; a nun with blind faith who’s in love with the leader of the guerillas and the weakest link of them all, the humiliated servant”.

«(The play) presents a version of reality that, as well as complying with the esthetic intentions of theater, asks fundamental questions of and challenges the audience»

El Espectador, Colombia

«Everyone here kills - both those on the outside and those on the inside – either in a hail of bullets or with constant silence and disapproval (…). (A) magnificent production»

El Comercio, Peru

«Rubiano’s script and directing go beyond (the violence of drug traffickers), showing the other kind of terror in the play - that created by a powerful upper class family»

Milenio, Mexico

A flawless and convincing play, like a ticking clock or a bomb about to explode

­­–El Tiempo, Colombia

«(The play) presents a version of reality that, as well as complying with the esthetic intentions of theater, asks fundamental questions of and challenges the audience»

El Espectador, Colombia

«Everyone here kills - both those on the outside and those on the inside – either in a hail of bullets or with constant silence and disapproval (…). (A) magnificent production»

El Comercio, Peru

«Rubiano’s script and directing go beyond (the violence of drug traffickers), showing the other kind of terror in the play - that created by a powerful upper class family»

Milenio, Mexico

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