Country Poland

Discipline Theater

Audience Youth | Adults

Recomended for +16

Duration 60 minutes

Language Polish, with Spanish subtitles

Dates January 6, 7 and 8, 19:00

Keywords Homophobia | LGBTIQ

A queer fantasy that directly and cheerfully attacks and deconstructs the military rhetoric and nationalistic ethos in Poland

The Theater Times

Cezary Goes To War (Cezary Idzie Na Wojnę) is a piece that uses autobiography as a pretext: acclaimed Polish director Cezary Tomaszewski relives his time doing military service — something measured according to degrees of masculinity — and turns it into a queer fantasy full of music, dance and theater, with Shostakovich’s war symphonies the musical basis for aerobic exercises or Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun by Nijinsky a reason to dance ballet in the locker rooms. The play, created as part of the Pre-war/War/Post-war series by Komuna//Warszawska - one of the most important independent theaters in Poland - reveals the absurdity of the nationalism currently popular in the country and, at the same time, questions virility as a social value. After winning several awards and getting outstanding reviews, Tomaszewski brings this daring and disruptive piece to Chile. Four actors and a pianist play out a personal but also universal story: in spite of the cultural changes that have occurred where women are concerned, men are still expected to have a masculinity based on brute force, violence, competitivity, indifference and conflict.

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Direction

Cezary Tomaszewski

(Poland, 1976)

Cezary Tomaszewski is an outstanding Polish choreographer, theater director and actor, creator of operas and theater plays which usually involve experimenting with classic pieces. He studied theater and dance and, for 15 years, sung with the Polish National Opera. This experience is the basis for his experimentation with classical music, putting it into unexpected contexts in order to question the rigidity and conventionalism of these scholarly pieces. His experimental work, often considered controversial in Poland, has won numerous awards and has been performed at different European venues.

Director Cezary Tomaszewski Cast Michał Dembiński, Weronika Krówka, Oskar Malinowski, Bartosz Ostrowski, Łukasz Stawarczyk Written by Klaudia Hartung-Wójciak Script Justyna Wąsik Costume designer Bracia: Agnieszka Klepacka & Maciej Chorąży Lighting designer Antoni Grałe Produced by Bracia (Agnieszka Klepacka, Maciej Chorąży), Antoni Grałek, Justyna Wąsik, Klaudia Hartung-Wójciak Music by Debussy, Handel, Moniuszko, Shostakovich.

  • This play allows Chilean audiences to get a closer look at the plays currently being produced in one of the European countries with the most active scene and longest theater history. Last year, it was the turn of director Krystian Lupa (1943), one of the most renowned and important names on the Polish and European scene, to come to Santiago a Mil and this year Cezary Tomaszewski brings a sample of theater from a younger generation.

  • Cezary Goes To War was chosen by Polish critics as one of the most interesting shows last year. It has been performed at important venues, including the Edinburgh Festival in Scotland. Among other honors, it won an award from the Divine Comedy Festival in Krakow for best artistic team.

  • Cezary Goes To War uses theater to take a look at Poland’s current political situation: for several decades, it has been one of the European countries where the ultra-right have become most entrenched and where art has therefore had to make a stand. Tomaszewski criticizes the patriarchal and militaristic rhetoric that is nowadays not only heard in Poland but worldwide. The Pre-war/War/Post-war series by Komuna//Warszawa was born as a result: the war in the Ukraine and the Middle East and the victories of Brexit and Trump are proof that war and hostility aren’t just something from the past.

  • Cezary Goes To War is a piece with a strong musical basis: Cezary Tomaszewski integrates some of his musical training into it by using previously untouchable pieces by Debussy, Handel, Moniuszko and Shostakovich and including them in a play that is as joyful as it is critical. The director explains that “theater and classical western music are still sacred in Poland (and, as a result), we’re supposed to ‘become more cultured’. The stage is a place to reveal great truths about the world. What I’m interested in is creating a crossover between these two elements”.

  • Tomaszewski brings a radically contemporary and scarcely touched upon matter to our attention: the model of masculinity still promoted in the West continues intact, in spite of advances in feminism and the spread of theories on gender as a social and cultural construct.
  • Queer. This is a term used to describe people who don’t identify as binary men/women and who reject this hegemonic way of classifying people. In the words of philosopher Judith Butler “queer is an argument against certain norms, against what an adequate lesbian or gay identity should be made up of”. In other words, it’s a concept that recognizes identities, genders and sexual orientations that defy definition. Both as a theory and as political activism, being queer promotes accepting diversity, dissidence and pluralities.

  • Komuna//Warszawska. One of the most important independent theaters in Poland, it’s based in Warsaw and was set up more than two decades ago. Its shows focus on experimental pieces that embrace theater, video and music. It initially emerged as part of Komuna Otwock, one of the most relevant independent theater groups in Poland in the last few decades.

«This Polish production is something special: funny yet poignant and smart in its layering of style and content»

The Times, London

«This sensational play exposes the totalitarian nature of a patriarchal and violent world view, removing love for other human beings and replacing it with love for the nation»

Dwutygodnik, Poland

A queer fantasy that directly and cheerfully attacks and deconstructs the military rhetoric and nationalistic ethos in Poland

The Theater Times

«This Polish production is something special: funny yet poignant and smart in its layering of style and content»

The Times, London

«This sensational play exposes the totalitarian nature of a patriarchal and violent world view, removing love for other human beings and replacing it with love for the nation»

Dwutygodnik, Poland

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