Country Chile

Discipline Theater

Audience Youth | Adults

Recomended for +14

Duration 100 minutes

Language Spanish

Dates January 18, 22.00h / January 19, 17.00h y 22.00h / January 20, 20.00h

One of this season’s most outstanding productions

­­–Radio Biobio

Harsh, humorous and sweet, Carnaval is a journey involving the stories of different children from all over the world who have survived situations that were brutal, violent and unjust. Told innocently but with the incredible resilience and directness of children, these stories reveal experiences and emotions that are part of the vicious circle of poverty, violence and abandonment that constantly causes them hurt. In carnivals, time stands still, hierarchies disappear and a catharsis occurs. Under this premise, the play hurtles along powerfully, with live music, singing, dancing and humor connecting the different stories, which also act as a kind of salve for the neglect suffered. Written and directed by Trinidad González, Carnaval is a collage of sad and outrageous situations from a reality we all form part of.

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Direction

Trinidad González

(Chile)

Trinidad González is a renowned Chilean actress, director, playwright and acting coach. She was one of the founders of the prestigious Teatro en el Blanco (Neva, Diciembre, La Reunión), performing in around thirty countries worldwide. She has written, directed and acted in their plays La Reunión and Pájaro. Dramatic readings of their plays have been held in Spain, the United States, Brazil, Canada and Mexico.

Written and directed by Trinidad González | Actors Matteo Citarella, Tomás González, Trinidad González | Music Tomás González | Lighting designer Nicole Needham | Set and costume designers Martina Citarella and the Carnaval team | Poster photo Belén Panizo | | Production Katy Cabezas | Co-produced by Taller Siglo XX and Yolanda Hurtado

  • Trinidad González is one of the most outstanding theater directors and playwrights of a generation of creators that made their mark on a local theater scene in which men historically predominated. In the La Tercera newspaper in 2018, she was mentioned together with Nona Fernández, Manuela Infante, Isidora Stevenson, Lucía de la Maza, Ximena Carrera, Mónica Droully, Flavia Radrigán, Sally Campusano and Emilia Noguera in an article called ‘Chilean playwrights in bloom”.

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  • Carnaval deals with the topic of damaged childhoods using the voice of children themselves, something rarely seen on stage. In the words of the director, “we take on the voices of the children to reconstruct their stories in a collage, only accompanied by a keyboard, guitars and the most minimal elements (…) The child’s voice allows us to speak without reservations, embellishments or censorship, like children do. These ones in particular speak out as the victims of war, as refugees or as child labor”.

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  • The production creates a contrast between carnival celebrations and the drama of children who have had to deal with a brutal reality, from a teenager in the Middle East forced to marry an older man to a young child whose parents make him work as a shepherd in Patagonia. “Carnivals are an opportunity for people to let their hair down, with roles reversed and the oppressed freed. It’s a good contrast to sadness and so, in this case, a powerful dramatic tool”, explains González.
  • The play’s origins. The idea of putting on Carnaval arose from Trinidad González’ trip to Yungas in Bolivia to teach a children’s workshop with actors Tomás González and Matteo Citarella. “We thought we’d do a play about child labor, poverty and education, taking different stories that allowed us to reinforce the fact that these problems are everywhere. There are brutal realities and stories both in Chile and in the rest of the world”, says the playwright and director.

  • The voice of children. The play stars adult actors who use their voices to bring stories t whose main characters are children to life, something highlighted by Bío Bío Radio’s theater critic, Leopoldo Pulgar. “(The actors transmit the frankness and innocence of children) without imitating or caricaturizing childish ways of speaking (…). Their adult voices are completely recognizable, but are shot through with cadences and tones that reflect the fear and insecurity of humans forced to emigrate, live in poverty and suffer violence and abandonment”.

«A very special experience, whose name conveys an event, an atmosphere and a cultural dimension that includes music and dance, as well as the humor that surfaces at even the saddest moments»

Bio Bio Radio

«Eight stories that all have poverty, abuse and abandonment running through them»

La Tercera

One of this season’s most outstanding productions

­­–Radio Biobio

«A very special experience, whose name conveys an event, an atmosphere and a cultural dimension that includes music and dance, as well as the humor that surfaces at even the saddest moments»

Bio Bio Radio

«Eight stories that all have poverty, abuse and abandonment running through them»

La Tercera

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