Country Austria

Discipline Urban intervention

Recomended for General Audience

Duration 60 minutes

Dates January 8, 9, 11 and 12, Santiago (time to be confirmed)

Warning There is no seating. The audience moves around and follows the dancers.

The physical strength and concentration required for such feats is extraordinary. But the pleasure for the viewer comes from the way that you suddenly spot a form in an unexpected place. Like living statues, these are human beings disrupting a city landscape

The Telegraph

Cities have nooks and crannies, empty spaces, sterile areas. Austrian artist and choreographer Willi Dorner aims to bring new life to spaces we don’t normally give a second glance to by filling them with immobile and colorful bodies that merge with the city. Bodies In Urban Spaces is a mobile journey, a choreographed intervention by a group of agile and flexible dancers dressed in bright colors, who adopt impossible positions to fill up these areas. They crouch, bend down, are squashed one on top of the other like pieces in a puzzle or in a game of Tetris, making up a series of temporary living sculptures that open our eyes to new points of view and different visions of the city and daily life.

After presenting Every-One in Santiago a Mil 2018, Dorner and his company return to Chile with Bodies In Urban Spaces, a worldwide phenomenon that has been taking over cities for ten years, offering audiences new experiences, encouraging them to look at the streets in a different way and to ask themselves about the relationship between architecture and the body. Its performances in Chile involve 20 local artists, chosen as a result of an open casting call.

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Company

Compañía Willi Dorner

Company created in Vienna in 1999 by Willi Dorner, this company has produced more than 20 pieces for theater and cinema, as well as carrying out urban interventions and running projects in places such as art galleries. Its approach is based on studying the relationship between the body and space using different formats. It has toured in numerous countries and cities performing its pieces, fusing theater, dance, performance and multiple physical disciplines like acrobatics and parkour.

Director

Willi Dorner

(Austria, 1959)

An award-winning choreographer, artist and director who lives in Vienna. He has studied multiple disciplines and subjects, including modern dance, physical education, philosophy and the visual arts. He danced as part of several different groups before creating his own company, which is renowned for staging performances in public around the world. His pieces usually offer audiences new experiences, making them look at everyday life differently. He has made several short films about dance with different Austrian filmmakers and, together with Lisa Rastl, he published the Bodies in Urban Spaces book of photography.

Esther Steinkogler

Created by Willi Dorner Photos Lisa Rastl | Assistant choreographer Esther Steinkogler | Produced by Emanuela Panucci | Manager Roma Janus | Cast Gabriela Amaro, Sofía Arenas Lissi, Franco Baeza, Cristobal Barra Corvalan, Camila Cavieres, María Paz Correa Quezada, Antonia de la Maza Bunster, Antonia Garrido González, Paula Doenitz, Joaquín Leal Luco, Cristobal Martínez Morales, Javier Muñoz Jiménez, Valentin Ochoa , Andrés Parra, Carlos Sánchez, Carmen Gloria Venegas Soriano, Camila Mora, Juan Bastián Saez, Camila Rojas Cannobbio, Igor Pezo Rivera | Produced by The Willi Dorner Company, the Paris Quartier d’Été Festival, France; Urban Connections Chamarande, France |

  • The audience is an active part of Bodies In Urban Spaces: the dancers plan out a route in the city and follow it in the company of the spectators, stopping every now and again to create their ‘bodily sculptures’. They become part of the urban landscape, creating a contrast between the city’s rigidity and the human body’s flexibility.

  • Since its creation in 2007, this piece has been presented in more than 80 cities in countries such as England, France, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Austria and the United States. It’s a highly-successful global phenomenon that was awarded the BLAULAUT-Price award for interdisciplinary art in 2011. The Bodies in Urban Spaces book of photography was published with photographer Lisa Rastl.

  • Author and director Willi Dorner is an internationally renowned choreographer, known for his original pieces, in which he encourages a city’s inhabitants to journey through and look at it from a different perspective. He has received numerous awards in Europe for his exploration of new forms of theater and performance, gaining fame for his in situ choreographies.

  • Santiago is a city that is changing at breakneck speed and which is constantly growing. This is one of the key issues Dorner wants to raise awareness of. In his own words, he “wants to make residents take a walk through their own cities to discover the constant changes that are occurring. And I want to start them thinking about architecture. Our cities are going to fill up in the next few decades and we urgently need to discuss how we can live together and how we can design our lives in these cities to make them livable”.
  • Urban intervention. This is the name given to artistic experiences aimed at creating new ways of understanding the relationship between society and space, between cities and those who live in them. Places can be taken over in various ways, for example by video projections, sculptures, performances, posters or graffiti. An urban intervention aims to forge new interactions and experiences regarding how urban spaces are considered, understood and lived in.

  • Parkour. This discipline, of French origin, involves people jumping over any urban obstacle that gets in their way at high speed, using acrobatics to move from one place to the next without any kind of equipment. Parkour includes movements like running, jumping and climbing and is inspired by the obstacle courses that are part of military training.

  • Every-One. This is the show that Willi Dorner brought to Chile in 2018, involving a group of eight dancers moving from one place in Santiago to the next, performing choreographies that relied on songs, sounds, audiovisual elements and objects.

«Lying down, lying on top of each other on the ground like it’s no big deal, squashed up against the city’s buildings … their insolence is more than surprising»

Huffington Post

«Architecture, space and the human body interact to help us understand where humans live»

El Mundo

«This has been an outright success wherever it’s been performed. The city becomes the stage and the inhabitants its actors»

France Info

The physical strength and concentration required for such feats is extraordinary. But the pleasure for the viewer comes from the way that you suddenly spot a form in an unexpected place. Like living statues, these are human beings disrupting a city landscape

The Telegraph

«Lying down, lying on top of each other on the ground like it’s no big deal, squashed up against the city’s buildings … their insolence is more than surprising»

Huffington Post

«Architecture, space and the human body interact to help us understand where humans live»

El Mundo

«This has been an outright success wherever it’s been performed. The city becomes the stage and the inhabitants its actors»

France Info

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