Country Mexico

Discipline Theater

Audience Youth | Adults

Recomended for +12

Duration 109 minutes

Language Spanish

Dates 18 y 19 enero, 21.00h / 20 de enero 19.00h

Warning Partial nudity

Gaitán’s adaptation of Sophocles work is both original and ingenious

Excelsior, México

There’s nothing more powerful than the myth of Antigone to bring the concepts of justice, politics and freedom into question: a woman takes a stand before the authorities to do what she considers her duty. Antigone illegally buried her brother, Polynices, against the orders of Creon, King of Thebes, who ordered him not to be given a decent burial because he was a traitor. Bringing this trial to the stage, the renowned Mexican playwright and director David Gaitán instigates a discussion on democracy, political power and freedom of expression and the duties and responsibilities of governors and citizens. He does so in an inclusive way, turning the theater into a public debate in which both actors and the audience take part and which can only be resolved with the deliberations of all the attendees. Having dazzled Mexican critics, this production poses several awkward questions. Should the people’s opinions, state power and democracy be blindly trusted? Is state law more important than natural law?

In modern Spanish and with a mostly young cast, David Gaitán brings his Antígona into the turbulent Mexican present, creating an important piece that uses fiction to delve into politics, sociology and philosophy.

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Direction

David Gaitán

(Mexico, 1984)

David Gaitán is a director, playwright and actor who is part of a new generation of renowned Mexican creators characterized by their multidisciplinary pieces and for their challenging reflections on today’s society. In 2006, he founded the Teatro Legeste company. He has acted in theater and film, written 13 plays and directed seven different productions. He was selected as one of the Royal Court Theater in London’s group of international playwrights in 2010 and was an artist in residence at the Lark Play Development Center in New York in 2012. His plays have been performed at important theaters in Europe, Latin America and the United States.

Written and directed by David Gaitán | Executive producer Mishell Ordóñez | Consultant Gabriel Zapata | Assistant director Andrea Padilla Gutiérrez | Stage designer Auda Caraza** and Atenea Chávez | Lighting designer Matías Gorlero | Lighting assistant and set designer Félix Arroyo | Costume designer Ricardo Loyola | Sound designer Xiconténcatl Reyes | Assistant sound designer Dulce Mariel Gutiérrez | Pantomime consultant Enrique Estrada | Cast Marianella Villa (Antigone), Adrián Ladrón (Creon), Haydeé Boetto (Wisdom), Alan Uribe Villarruel (Haemon), Ana Zavala (Ismene), Guillermo Nava (Guard), Mishell Ordóñez (Lover) | Produced by Teatro Unam, 2015.

**Member of the National Network for Creators of the Arts (FONCA)

  • The Antigone myth has been crucial to Western society’s questioning and debating of the idea of justice as a complex social construct. David Gaitán transports it to the present and relates it to current Mexican politics, where cases such as the disappearance of 43 students from Ayotzinapa (2014) reveal the problems in the political and legal system.

  • David Gaitán is currently one of the most outstanding young voices on Mexico’s theater scene. He has written and directed around 10 plays, which have been performed in cities in Europe, Latin America and the United States. In 2016, he won the best director award for Antígona from the Mexican Association of Theater Critics and Journalists.

  • For David Gaitán, Antigone’s story is “terrifyingly relevant”, going far beyond the important historical topics it deals with. “We were inspired by the possibility of staging a discussion on politics that we still think is necessary. In a world in which leaders govern in an increasingly more theatrical way, looking at a character’s complexity and using that theatricality to question reality seems to us to be a powerful tie to the present”, he explains. As a result, the need emerges to question the Greek original’s stereotypes, in which Creon is a tyrant and Antigone represents civility.

  • The play questions the values and concepts that we take for granted (justice, politics, democracy and freedom of expression), but also voices its concern for other topics, such as our relationship with the divine, social activism and the responsibility of governors and citizens.

  • Antígona was a sell-out in Mexico, with more than 100 performances in its first season.
  • Antigone. A Greek tragedy written by Sophocles around 442 BC, it tells the story of Antigone, daughter of Oedipus, who disobeys Creon, King of Thebes’ orders forbidding her from burying the body of her brother, a traitor. It is a functional story based on a discussion of democracy, justice and civil disobedience, as well as the struggle between individual will and state power. It has been turned into theater plays and films on several occasions.

  • Tragedy. A dramatic genre in which the hero faces an unavoidably tragic end. Its name comes from the Greek word tragoedia, which means ‘goat-song’, referring to the rites the Greeks carried out in honor of Dionysius.

«A defiant interpretation of the well-known Greek play»

Gazeta, Mexico

«David Gaitán’s adaptation of Antigone becomes something completely contemporary, both powerful and deep»

Interescena, Mexico

«Based on Sophocles’ work, this play is the story of a woman brave enough to take a stand against men to achieve her aims, challenging the norms they themselves established»

—Reforma, Mexico

Gaitán’s adaptation of Sophocles work is both original and ingenious

Excelsior, México

«A defiant interpretation of the well-known Greek play»

Gazeta, Mexico

«David Gaitán’s adaptation of Antigone becomes something completely contemporary, both powerful and deep»

Interescena, Mexico

«Based on Sophocles’ work, this play is the story of a woman brave enough to take a stand against men to achieve her aims, challenging the norms they themselves established»

—Reforma, Mexico

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