Country Bolivia

Discipline Theater

Audience Youth | Adults

Recomended for +14

Duration 45 minutes

Language Spanish

Dates January 15, 16 and 17, 19.30h

Keywords Drama | Women | Platea 19

At the end of the show, the applause is overwhelming and sincere. (Riera’s work) is meticulous, sensitive and moving

La Razón, Bolivia

It’s usually said we’re creatures of habit and that we can adapt to anything, even violence. Animales domésticos explores this idea using the domestic abuse of women: on stage is Ana, a woman who acts like a dog - waiting, moving her behind like she has a tail, going for walks and sleeping in the confines of four walls. Her bed is her safe place and love is a scar that leaves marks on her skin. Ana is involved in battles and truces every day, all the time dreaming of a house in the Munich condominium. Bolivian director and playwright Andrea Riera dreamed up this play with actresses and creators Piti Campos and Alice Guimaräes to try and understand what women will become for love or out of fear or habit. “(This play) reflects the need to look at ourselves and other women. Femicide is knocking on the door of our neighbors, friends, sisters, mothers, daughters; we’re doing this because we think that silence can be just as violent”.

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Direction

Andrea Riera

(Bolivia)

Andrea Riera is a playwright and cultural consultant. She co-founded the first theater platform in Bolivia - PUNTO BO - an independent company that promotes the production and touring of plays starring her country’s main actors. She is general coordinator of LATEscena (Performing Arts Lab), a center for artistic training and production and for implementing development projects using the arts. She began her artistic training in 1997 with the ZigZag Theater and in 2002 co-founded the Altoteatro group, co-directing them until 2012 and touring with different productions both in Bolivia and in countries such as Brazil and Chile. In 2016, she was involved in opening LATEsucre, a center based on LATEscena.

Directed and final script by Andrea Riera | Written by Piti Campos, Alice Guimaräes and Andrea Riera | Cast Piti Campos Villanueva | Actors’ director Alice Guimaräes | Concept and drafting of the script Piti Campos and Andrea Riera (the play includes the text ‘El Resfrío’ by Alex Aillón Valverde) | Lighting designers and set consultants Gonzalo Callejas and Alice Guimaräes | Photography and graphic designer Camilo Bejarano | Music ‘I’ll drown’ de Soley and Sunshine by CocoRosie | Produced by LATEScena and LATEsucre

  • Animales domésticos was unanimously chosen as the winner of the award for best theater play at the XI Municipal Competition at the Raúl Salmón de la Barra Theater in Bolivia for its way of tackling the reality of the domestic abuse of women. As well as being performed in that country, the play was part of the Latin American and Caribbean May Theater Season organized by the Casa de las Américas in Cuba in May 2018.

  • It’s a play that tackles crucial issues in our society: domestic violence, the abuse of women and femicide. “Above all, it show us that violence is closer than we think. We have to pay more attention and be a little more aware. It’s something that needs to be stopped and that we shouldn’t get used to”, explains director and writer Andrea Riera.

  • To write this play, the creators researched femicide in Bolivia. “Even though the figures in our country are alarming, the number of femicides is still growing and there’s no awareness of it. We wanted to work on what happens to people when violence is involved. What makes us violent? Why do we become violent? At what point do we become conscious of the violence we’re creating? These are the questions Riera, Campos and Guimaräes asked themselves.
  • Domestic violence in Bolivia. According to the latest study by the Public Ministry In Bolivia, since Law 384 was passed (to guarantee women a life free from violence) on March 9, 2013, 455 cases of femicide and 129,130 cases of family or domestic violence have been recorded in the country (up to March 6, 2018), which means domestic violence hasn’t gone down over last few years. According to UN sources, this phenomenon in Latin America and the Caribbean has “a high correlation to the extreme inequality and poverty” existing in the region.

  • Figures for Chile. According to the figures published by the Activa Research Agency and the Worldwide Independent Network of Market Research (WIN), 30% of women in Chile have been victims of domestic violence (whether physical or psychological) and 39% have been victims of sexual harassment over the last year. Of all the women surveyed from 11 of the continent’s countries, Chileans come second in the ranking of those who have suffered the most domestic violence recently.

«Animales domésticos is the result of needing the stage to talk about and alert people to domestic violence, femicide and the dangers of a macho society»

Casa de las Américas, Cuba

«Animales domésticos: domestic animals, that’s what we are. And it’s not bad to say so, to admit it and question it. To find out what domesticates us; how, who and what the bonds that domesticate us are made of. That’s what we should be asking ourselves. That’s the key question this play asks and that causes us discomfort»

Correo del Sur, Bolivia

«It makes you feel uncomfortable, as any decent theater play should, by asking you what you dreamed about as a child. And it gives you the answer. I should have left a long time ago. We shouldn’t be suffering anymore»

La Razón, Bolivia

At the end of the show, the applause is overwhelming and sincere. (Riera’s work) is meticulous, sensitive and moving

La Razón, Bolivia

«Animales domésticos is the result of needing the stage to talk about and alert people to domestic violence, femicide and the dangers of a macho society»

Casa de las Américas, Cuba

«Animales domésticos: domestic animals, that’s what we are. And it’s not bad to say so, to admit it and question it. To find out what domesticates us; how, who and what the bonds that domesticate us are made of. That’s what we should be asking ourselves. That’s the key question this play asks and that causes us discomfort»

Correo del Sur, Bolivia

«It makes you feel uncomfortable, as any decent theater play should, by asking you what you dreamed about as a child. And it gives you the answer. I should have left a long time ago. We shouldn’t be suffering anymore»

La Razón, Bolivia

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